Alarms go off when I enter the building

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80,467 notes

"My response to the “I am not a feminist” internet phenomenon….

First of all, it’s clear you don’t know what feminism is. But I’m not going to explain it to you. You can google it. To quote an old friend, “I’m not the feminist babysitter.”

But here is what I think you should know.

You’re insulting every woman who was forcibly restrained in a jail cell with a feeding tube down her throat for your right to vote, less than 100 years ago.

You’re degrading every woman who has accessed a rape crisis center, which wouldn’t exist without the feminist movement.

You’re undermining every woman who fought to make marital rape a crime (it was legal until 1993).

You’re spitting on the legacy of every woman who fought for women to be allowed to own property (1848). For the abolition of slavery and the rise of the labor union. For the right to divorce. For women to be allowed to have access to birth control (Comstock laws). For middle and upper class women to be allowed to work outside the home (poor women have always worked outside the home). To make domestic violence a crime in the US (It is very much legal in many parts of the world). To make workplace sexual harassment a crime.

In short, you know not what you speak of. You reap the rewards of these women’s sacrifices every day of your life. When you grin with your cutsey sign about how you’re not a feminist, you ignorantly spit on the sacred struggle of the past 200 years. You bite the hand that has fed you freedom, safety, and a voice.

In short, kiss my ass, you ignorant little jerks.”

Libby Anne (via newwavenova)

(Source: dumbledoresarmy-againstbigotry, via nanoochka)

Filed under knowledge

4,389 notes

Enough

teenwolfgossip:

For the fans who’s time, effort, and passion for the show was ridiculed by Jeff Davis and the cast by reading their fanfics, mocking their hard work and love for the characters they portray, it’s time we say enough.

For the fan who asked the cast the innocent question of, “If you could ship literally any pairing that’s not currently canon on the show, who would you ship?” and was then mocked by Dylan O’Brien, who incredulously told the fan “This is the last question in the entire panel,” and was then mocked by Tyler Posey, who told the fan to “Think of a better question,” it’s time we say enough.

For the fans that were told that fanworks depicting two characters could not be signed, while fanworks depicting other pairings are acceptable, it’s time we say enough.

For the Teen Wolf fandom, who have been disrespected repeatedly by the Teen Wolf marketing team and Jeff Davis himself, for the fans that have been used by the powers that be to win polls and then mocked and humiliated once we’re no longer needed, for every person who passionately love this show and then has been shamed for that love by the cast and creators, it’s time we say enough.

It’s time to remind them why they need us.

We are calling for a general Teen Wolf Blackout for Monday’s episode.  We need to reach the producers of the show in a way that they can understand.

What can you do?

  1. Do not tweet anything Teen Wolf related during Monday’s episode.  Do not tweet the actors or the Teen Wolf account.  Do not use any hashtags related to Teen Wolf.
  2. If you have a Nielsen box, do not watch Monday night’s episode on TV. 
  3. Do not reblog the gifs or posts from the Teen Wolf tumblr account.
  4. Do not watch the episode on MTV.com.
  5. Reblog, reblog, reblog.  Spread the word.  Tell your friends, tweet the message prior to Monday’s episode.  

And before anyone asks - this isn’t to make Sterek canon, this has nothing to do with any ship or character, this isn’t to ask for anything plot related in the show.  This is a simple reminder that this show survives because of it’s fans, and we deserved to be treated with respect.

Spread the word.

(via agentotter)

Filed under agreed teen wolf teen wolf blackout

3,375 notes

thepeoplesrecord:

9 clueless things white people say when confronted with their own racismJuly 11, 2014
Daring to talk about Iggy Azalea’s racism and cultural appropriation doesn’t make me a racist.
But judging from the tens of thousands of Web comments, tweets and Facebook posts about the piece, “How to talk to white people about Iggy Azalea,” those of us who dare criticize appropriation in hip-hop are part of the problem for “making this about race” and halting society from true progress on racial equity. Nothing could be further from the truth.
It’s about time we unpack all of the clueless vitriol that often comes from white people when we dare to talk about race.
Unfortunately, this episode reinforces a dismal reality in our racial climate: We still haven’t arrived to a point where we can have an open, honest and productive conversation about racism. And, generally speaking, it’s really not anyone’s fault.
Unless you’ve gone to a university or a high school where the issue of privilege—racial and otherwise—has been the subject of a school workshop or a classroom discussion, reading articles about it on the Internet may very well be the first time you encounter the subject matter. And no one’s faulting you for that, because there’s even something to be said about the educational privilege that corresponds with having opportunities to access intellectually rigorous academic settings.
But now that we have the Internet, we have a community-sourced space to have these discussions organically. Because of the immense amount of information available, not just those long lists of cat GIFs, there’s not too much time left for excusing people who aren’t using it as a resource to learn about racial prejudice and white privilege.
It seems as though, when the conversation isn’t as clear cut, such as when whites use the n-word or refuse services based on skin color, just bringing up racism puts many on the defensive or prompts the angered denial of its existence. That’s the reaction many black and people of color are absolutely tired of receiving from so many people who have racial privilege, all of whom will never have any tangible idea of what it’s like to experience the daily social and institutional indignities of being non-white in America.
Many people of color want the space to discuss these issues within a culture where white voices are hyper-amplified––to have their voices heard and respected, even if the emotions come from a place of pain.
As people who benefit from racial privilege, whites can support the leadership of people of color by first challenging these deeply-ingrained myths about racism before entering into a conversation about it, especially with people of color:
1) “You’re racist for making this an issue of race.”
More often than not, when a person of color brings up racism, chances are there’s something problematic happening. It’d be naive to assume that people of color simply exist as opportunists who pounce on any single chance to make a big deal about racism. If you’re tired of hearing about racism, how tired do you think people of color are from having to live surrounded by racism in the first place?
2) “I don’t see race. I only see the human race.”
While this may sound revolutionary, so-called color-blindness is actually part of the problem. Not “seeing race” is simply a lazy coded phrase for deliberately ignoring the lingering elements of racism that actually need to be fixed and reinforces the privilege of being able to bypass the negative effects of racism in the first place. As the saying goes, “You can’t erase what you cannot face.”
3) “Talking about issues in terms of ‘white people’ and ‘white privilege’ is reverse racism.”
About that reverse racism thing… it doesn’t exist. It’s no secret that it is humanly possible for a person of color to be prejudiced against whites. Sometimes, it’s an attitude that develops over time because their experience with racism has drawn them to the conclusion that no “good” white people exist in the world. And although there’s a lot of healing that needs to happen in that much more seldom instance of prejudice, the attitude itself doesn’t come with an entire system of benefits and institutional power that being white affords in America. That’s the difference between racism and prejudice, because racism at its root is about supremacy.
4) “You [person of color] clearly don’t know what racism is. According to Webster’s Dictionary…”
Don’t do it. Step away from this infantilizing situation to avoid being a white person dictating how racism works to a person of color, despite their actual lived experiences with it. As for how Webster’s and other dictionaries defines the issue? The oversimplification is a topic that merits an entire thesis.
5) “You [person of color] said something about white people doing racist things, so I demand you explain this to me right now.”
People of color are not on-demand racial justice educators, especially if they have no relationship or affinity with someone seeking the knowledge. In the age of the Internet, if you don’t know someone from a particular community you can speak with, you can likely find those voices on blogs, on Twitter, or even in columns and news articles, talking about the very things you’re seeking to understand. Instead of taxing the already tapped reserves of people of color when dealing with racism, try self-educating before knocking on someone’s door.
6) “But my [person of color] friend said it was OK if I did it [racially problematic thing].”
Still, it’s not the best idea to apply that relational dynamic with one friend to an entire group of people, many of whom have a different relationship with certain words, phrases or actions. Would you touch the hair of a black female stranger just because your black female friend allows you to touch hers?
7) “Stop attacking me for having privileges just because I’m white. It’s racist and hurtful.”
When people critique racism and white privilege in America, they’re speaking generally about a system and not the individual. Unless, that is, an individual instance merits the person being held accountable for their actions (i.e. Donald Sterling, Paula Deen, Iggy Azalea).
8) “I’m sick of pretending that [people of color] need special rights and programs just because they aren’t white. We have problems too, you know.”
To have problems in life is an inherent part of the human condition. But it takes humility, grace and empathy to take the time and space for reflection and self-examination to truly understand that some of us have it much better than others—despite our often half-hearted efforts to ensure equal opportunities for everyone, especially blacks and people of color. Yes, whites can be poor, or female, or LGBT, or immigrants, or have white skin but actually be multi-ethnic, the list goes on. That’s why intersectionality matters, and it includes an interrogation of racial privilege.
9) [Insert tear-filled expression of white privilege guilt or denial here.]
First, it’s okay to have emotions and to feel genuinely remorseful when it’s clear that a cruelly reprehensible system has been perpetuated in a word or an action. Emotional policing isn’t cool, and people of color know it all too well. However, more often than not, when the tears flow, they correlate with an outright rejection of the idea that whiteness in America is privileged and normalized in virtually every social and institutional structure. In this instance, instead of centering the many, intensely hurtful experiences of people of color, the person has derailed the conversation and made it completely about them.
It not only shifts accountability in a way that’s been historically dangerous, it also reinforces the very privilege being interrogated: Because these white tears and white feelings are often prioritized above the lived struggles of non-white people.
Derrick Clifton is a NYC-based journalist and writer primarily covering race, gender and LGBT issues, and their intersections with politics. Follow him on Twitter, on Facebook, or visit derrickclifton.com for more information on his work.
Photo via Iggy Azalea/YouTube
Source & you can follow The Daily Dot on Tumblr here

thepeoplesrecord:

9 clueless things white people say when confronted with their own racism
July 11, 2014

Daring to talk about Iggy Azalea’s racism and cultural appropriation doesn’t make me a racist.

But judging from the tens of thousands of Web comments, tweets and Facebook posts about the piece, “How to talk to white people about Iggy Azalea,” those of us who dare criticize appropriation in hip-hop are part of the problem for “making this about race” and halting society from true progress on racial equity. Nothing could be further from the truth.

It’s about time we unpack all of the clueless vitriol that often comes from white people when we dare to talk about race.

Unfortunately, this episode reinforces a dismal reality in our racial climate: We still haven’t arrived to a point where we can have an open, honest and productive conversation about racism. And, generally speaking, it’s really not anyone’s fault.

Unless you’ve gone to a university or a high school where the issue of privilege—racial and otherwise—has been the subject of a school workshop or a classroom discussion, reading articles about it on the Internet may very well be the first time you encounter the subject matter. And no one’s faulting you for that, because there’s even something to be said about the educational privilege that corresponds with having opportunities to access intellectually rigorous academic settings.

But now that we have the Internet, we have a community-sourced space to have these discussions organically. Because of the immense amount of information available, not just those long lists of cat GIFs, there’s not too much time left for excusing people who aren’t using it as a resource to learn about racial prejudice and white privilege.

It seems as though, when the conversation isn’t as clear cut, such as when whites use the n-word or refuse services based on skin color, just bringing up racism puts many on the defensive or prompts the angered denial of its existence. That’s the reaction many black and people of color are absolutely tired of receiving from so many people who have racial privilege, all of whom will never have any tangible idea of what it’s like to experience the daily social and institutional indignities of being non-white in America.

Many people of color want the space to discuss these issues within a culture where white voices are hyper-amplified––to have their voices heard and respected, even if the emotions come from a place of pain.

As people who benefit from racial privilege, whites can support the leadership of people of color by first challenging these deeply-ingrained myths about racism before entering into a conversation about it, especially with people of color:

1) “You’re racist for making this an issue of race.”

More often than not, when a person of color brings up racism, chances are there’s something problematic happening. It’d be naive to assume that people of color simply exist as opportunists who pounce on any single chance to make a big deal about racism. If you’re tired of hearing about racism, how tired do you think people of color are from having to live surrounded by racism in the first place?

2) “I don’t see race. I only see the human race.”

While this may sound revolutionary, so-called color-blindness is actually part of the problem. Not “seeing race” is simply a lazy coded phrase for deliberately ignoring the lingering elements of racism that actually need to be fixed and reinforces the privilege of being able to bypass the negative effects of racism in the first place. As the saying goes, “You can’t erase what you cannot face.”

3) “Talking about issues in terms of ‘white people’ and ‘white privilege’ is reverse racism.”

About that reverse racism thing… it doesn’t exist. It’s no secret that it is humanly possible for a person of color to be prejudiced against whites. Sometimes, it’s an attitude that develops over time because their experience with racism has drawn them to the conclusion that no “good” white people exist in the world. And although there’s a lot of healing that needs to happen in that much more seldom instance of prejudice, the attitude itself doesn’t come with an entire system of benefits and institutional power that being white affords in America. That’s the difference between racism and prejudice, because racism at its root is about supremacy.

4) “You [person of color] clearly don’t know what racism is. According to Webster’s Dictionary…”

Don’t do it. Step away from this infantilizing situation to avoid being a white person dictating how racism works to a person of color, despite their actual lived experiences with it. As for how Webster’s and other dictionaries defines the issue? The oversimplification is a topic that merits an entire thesis.

5) “You [person of color] said something about white people doing racist things, so I demand you explain this to me right now.”

People of color are not on-demand racial justice educators, especially if they have no relationship or affinity with someone seeking the knowledge. In the age of the Internet, if you don’t know someone from a particular community you can speak with, you can likely find those voices on blogs, on Twitter, or even in columns and news articles, talking about the very things you’re seeking to understand. Instead of taxing the already tapped reserves of people of color when dealing with racism, try self-educating before knocking on someone’s door.

6) “But my [person of color] friend said it was OK if I did it [racially problematic thing].”

Still, it’s not the best idea to apply that relational dynamic with one friend to an entire group of people, many of whom have a different relationship with certain words, phrases or actions. Would you touch the hair of a black female stranger just because your black female friend allows you to touch hers?

7) “Stop attacking me for having privileges just because I’m white. It’s racist and hurtful.”

When people critique racism and white privilege in America, they’re speaking generally about a system and not the individual. Unless, that is, an individual instance merits the person being held accountable for their actions (i.e. Donald SterlingPaula DeenIggy Azalea).

8) “I’m sick of pretending that [people of color] need special rights and programs just because they aren’t white. We have problems too, you know.”

To have problems in life is an inherent part of the human condition. But it takes humility, grace and empathy to take the time and space for reflection and self-examination to truly understand that some of us have it much better than others—despite our often half-hearted efforts to ensure equal opportunities for everyone, especially blacks and people of color. Yes, whites can be poor, or female, or LGBT, or immigrants, or have white skin but actually be multi-ethnic, the list goes on. That’s why intersectionality matters, and it includes an interrogation of racial privilege.

9) [Insert tear-filled expression of white privilege guilt or denial here.]

First, it’s okay to have emotions and to feel genuinely remorseful when it’s clear that a cruelly reprehensible system has been perpetuated in a word or an action. Emotional policing isn’t cool, and people of color know it all too well. However, more often than not, when the tears flow, they correlate with an outright rejection of the idea that whiteness in America is privileged and normalized in virtually every social and institutional structure. In this instance, instead of centering the many, intensely hurtful experiences of people of color, the person has derailed the conversation and made it completely about them.

It not only shifts accountability in a way that’s been historically dangerous, it also reinforces the very privilege being interrogated: Because these white tears and white feelings are often prioritized above the lived struggles of non-white people.

Derrick Clifton is a NYC-based journalist and writer primarily covering race, gender and LGBT issues, and their intersections with politics. Follow him on Twitter, on Facebook, or visit derrickclifton.com for more information on his work.

Photo via Iggy Azalea/YouTube

Source & you can follow The Daily Dot on Tumblr here

(via itsnoteasybeinggreenberg)

Filed under knowledge

96,811 notes

ellievolia:

gunslingaaahhh:

brokendaisychains:

sparklyfiend:

femmefaery:

afrometaphysics:

celestialcannibalism:

harryfloorcorn:

What is the meaning of life?

70 years of callous indifference

A lifetime of dying inside

Fucking smoking that good shit HA

Nothin’ but getting drunk.YEP.

All about doin’ whatever the fuck i want.AWW YEAH

WHO CARES? I’M TURNING MY BACK ON HUMANITY.

smokin blunts and callous indifference, aw yeah

ellievolia:

gunslingaaahhh:

brokendaisychains:

sparklyfiend:

femmefaery:

afrometaphysics:

celestialcannibalism:

harryfloorcorn:

What is the meaning of life?

70 years of callous indifference

A lifetime of dying inside

Fucking smoking that good shit HA

Nothin’ but getting drunk.

YEP.

All about doin’ whatever the fuck i want.

AWW YEAH

WHO CARES? I’M TURNING MY BACK ON HUMANITY.

smokin blunts and callous indifference, aw yeah

Filed under turning paper into stacking paper bruh studyandlove

36,979 notes

199,763 Plays

psychic-rising-demon:

gadreels-meatsuit:

super-hoopla-ck:

Okay story time. I assumed the audio was gonna be Sharp Dressed Man and decided to download it from tumblr without listening to it

And my mom had some friends over so she took my phone to play music. She finds Sharp Dressed Man and says “OMG THIS IS MY JAM EVRYONE SHUTUP.” Everyone quiets down then this shit starts to play and everyone is looking at her and sHES JUST STANDING THERE LIKE AN IDIOT AND IM IN THE OTHER ROOM JUST FUCKING DYING AND SHE JUST KINDA SITS BACK DOWN AND TURNS THE MUSIC OFF AND ITS LIKE DEAD SILENT FOR 5 MINUTES

OMFG I THINK I JUST PEED 

(Source: gayasshunter, via fieldsofpelennor)

Filed under gross cackling studyandlove

475,899 notes

kanyewestniall:

(Source: chriscanandwill, via tacoposey)

Filed under hmm....yes ANOTHER studyandlove

206,592 notes

studyandlove:

becausewhynoteathumans:

kaalashnikov:

leonardo-dicaprisun:

al4skan:

im actually laughing so hard at this

tHE GUY WITH THE CAMERA HAS THE PUREST CANADIAN ACCENT I’VE EVER HEARD OMFG

this is so canadian i shit a beaver

as i canadian i can tell you this is 100% of what we do all the time

Every goddamn winter, it’s the same shit.

(Source: lceburgs)

Filed under gross cackling

345,021 notes

khubleesi:

thatfunnyblog:

I LAUGHED AT THIS MUCH MORE THAN I SHOULD HAVE

I am so fucking happy this is back in my life once again

(Source: versaceslut, via buckybear)

Filed under hahahahahahahah